The joys of Dionysus had an extremely wide range, from the simple pleasures of the country bumpkin, dancing a jig on greased wineskins, to the ὠμοφάγος χάρις of the ecstatic bacchanal. At both levels, and at all the levels between, he is Lusios, “the Liberator”— the god who by very simple means, or by other means not so simple, enables you for a short time to stop being yourself , and thereby sets you free. That was, I think, the main secret of his appeal to the Archaic Age: not only because life in that age was often a thing to escape from, but more specifically because the individual, as the modern world knows him, began in that age to emerge for the first time from the old solidarity of the family, and found the unfamiliar burden of individual responsibility hard to bear. Dionysus could lift it from him. –E.R. Dodds, The Greeks and the Irrational

She was the single artificer of the world
In which she sang. And when she sang, the sea,
Whatever self it had, became the self
That was her song, for she was the maker. Then we,
As we beheld her striding there alone,
Knew that there never was a world for her
Except the one she sang and, singing, made.
–Wallace Stevens, On the Idea of Order at Key West

José Martí statue, at the Artists’ Gate, entrance to Central Park at 59th St and Ave of the Americas (6th Avenue). Inscription: "Apostle of Cuban Independence, Leader of the People’s of America and defender of human dignity. His literary genius and with his political foresight he was born in Havana on January 28 1853 for fifteen years of his life he lived in the city of New York. He died in action at Dos Rios in Oriente Province on May 19 1895."
José Martí statue, at the Artists’ Gate, entrance to Central Park at 59th St and 6th Ave. Inscription: “Apostle of Cuban Independence, Leader of the People’s of America and defender of human dignity…”

Liberty is the right of every man to be honest, to think and to speak without hypocrisy. –José Martí